Edison Opera Phonograph



This article is part of the ANTIQUE PHONOGRAPH, GRAMOPHONE AND TALKING MACHINE IDENTIFICATION GUIDES.
SEE ALSO: Our listings of outside horn talking machines for sale.


Introduced in 1911, the Opera phonograph represents Edison's highest achievement in the acoustic reproduction of sound.

In an effort to secure airtightness, the Model L reproducer sits in a stationary casting, under which traverses a moving mandrel, the opposite of the arrangement on most cylinder Edisons. This mechanism was based on the direct drive Amberola IA.

An oak version of the Opera was also available, in a somewhat less ornate case and minus the oxidized copper handles.

Late in the production run the name 'Opera' was dropped in favor of 'Concert,' as a result of litigation by the U-S phonograph company.

The Opera name was shared with an earlier, coin-operated Edison phonograph, which should not be confused with this machine.


Edison Opera Phonograph
Edison Opera phonograph, mahogany. A wooden horn was standard in both oak and mahogany versions. Larger image
Edison Opera Phonograph upperworks
Detail of the upperworks. The adjustable wire in front triggers a brake to stop at the end of the tune. A hole was cut in the lid to accomodate the height of the reproducer housing.
Larger image

Lynn Bilton
Box 435
Randolph,OH 44265
330 325-7866

Contact/
email

We buy, sell, and repair antique phonographs and music boxes.

Pick-up and delivery possible in many parts of the midwest, south, and northeast.

Mechanical music
for sale

See new listings
And more...